Tag Archives: Castle

Castle Road

The Castle Road (German: Burgenstraße) is a theme route in southern Germany (in Bavaria and BadenWürttemberg) and a small portion in the Czech Republic, between Mannheim and Prague.
It was established in 1954. In 1994 it was possible to extend it to Prague. It leads through the Neckar valley, the Hohenlohe Plateau, the Franconian Heights, Franconian Switzerland, the Fichtelgebirge and the Kaiserwald (Slavkovský les). The Castle Road has a length of over 1.000 Kilometers.

 

The Castle Road

Eltz Castle

Burg Eltz is a medieval castle nestled in the hills above the Moselle River between Koblenz and Trier, Germany. It is still owned by a branch of the same family that lived there in the 12th century, 33 generations ago. The Rübenach and Rodendorf families’ homes in the castle are open to the public, while the Kempenich branch of the family uses the other third of the castle. The Palace of Bürresheim (Schloss Bürresheim), the Castle of Eltz and the Castle of Lissingen are the only castles on the left bank of the Rhine in Rhineland-Palatinate which have never been destroyed.

 

Eltz Castle

Wartburg Castle

 

Wartburg Castle

The Wartburg is a castle situated on a 1230-foot (410-m) precipice to the southwest of, and overlooking the town of Eisenach, in the state of ThuringiaGermany. In 1999 UNESCO added Wartburg Castle to the World Heritage List as an “Outstanding Monument of the Feudal Period in Central Europe”, citing its “Cultural Values of Universal Significance”. 

The castle’s foundation was laid about 1068 by the Thuringian count of Schauenburg,Louis the Springer, a relative of the Counts of Rieneck in Franconia. Together with its larger sister castle Neuenberg in the present-day town of Freyburg, the Wartburg secured the extreme borders of his traditional territories. 

 

Wartburg Castle 2

 

Neuschwanstein Castle

Neuschwanstein Castle (German: Schloss Neuschwanstein)Neuschwanstein Castle  is a 19th-century Romanesque Revival palace on a above the village of Hohenschwangau near Füssen in southwest BavariaGermany. The palace was commissioned by Ludwig II of Bavaria as a retreat and as an homage to Richard Wagner. Ludwig paid for the palace out of his personal fortune and extensive borrowing, not with Bavarian public funds.

The palace was intended as a personal refuge for the reclusive king, but it was opened to the paying public immediately after his death in 1886.Since then near 60 million people have visited Neuschwanstein Castle.More than 1.3 million people visit annually, with up to 6,000 per day in the summer. The palace has appeared prominently in several movies and was the inspiration for Disneyland‘s Sleeping Beauty Castle and later, similar structures.

OCT 3 2012